Summer Road Trip 2016: California, Oregon, and Washington

When Pam and I were discussing summer plans (long before the summer), we decided on a northwest road trip. The trip was designed to allow us to catch-up with family and friends, see part of the country we had not seen much of, and scout out places for longer vacation stays in the future. We elected to drive to San Francisco and stash our car, rent a car to drive north, then fly back to San Francisco to drive home. It was a vacation of planes, trains, and automobiles (you’ll see the train part soon).

Travel map

A rough outline of our road trip route.

Our first stop was in San Francisco to visit Chris, Esther, Liam, and Aleksey. We had a great time catching up with them and going to a Giants game. On Saturday we walked to McCovey Cove, played some baseball on the little field by AT&T Park, and Chris made some excellent pizza–a good day.

Baseball 2

Hanging out with the nephews by McCovey Cove.

From San Francisco we headed north. We spent one night at the Union Creek Resort. It’s a little collection of cabins, a lodge, a cafe, and an ice cream shop. In the past Zane Grey, Jack London, and Herbert Hoover have called this little place a favorite vacation spot. It was drizzly and overcast when we arrived. Despite the rain, we got in a short hike. After the hike we got very berry pie at Beckie’s Cafe, which could also be called very good pie.

Union Creek Resort

Our cabin in the woods at Union Creek Resort.

The next morning we went to Crater Lake National Park.

Crater Lake

Crater Lake is very blue.

We wanted to hike to a lookout post on a peak, but were rebuffed by snow. The drifts were impressive. It’s the first time I have seen snow drifts 8 ft tall in July.

Crater Lake 3

The peak we hoped to hike (note the structure at the top, our intended destination).

After Crater Lake we saw the Pumice Desert, Clearwater Falls, and Watson Falls. From there we went to Bend and had lunch at the Deschutes Brewery Public House. Then it was back on the road, bound for Beaverton. We had a couple days to catch-up with Andy, meet Miranda and James, and see Portland. I was thrilled to visit the Portland Rose Garden. The plant selection in Portland was great. I saw familiar and new faces, and almost everything was thriving–especially the roses (and some locals were apologizing for the roses, saying they weren’t looking up to standards).

We had some excellent Korean food, watched the All-Star game, went to McMenamins Edgefield Theater, saw the Columbia River Gorge, and visited two waterfalls.

Columbia River Gorge

The Columbia River Gorge on a cloudy afternoon.

Multnomah Falls 4

With Andy and Miranda at Multnomah Falls.

Our next destination was the Olympic Peninsula. We stopped briefly in Forks. I shared all my secondhand Twilight knowledge with Pam, then we read the wikipedia plot summaries.

Forks

In Forks.

We saw the biggest known sitka spruce in the world.

Sitka Spruce

The sitka spruce world co-champion. I am in the picture for scale.

We stopped to look out at the Pacific Ocean.

Olympic Peninsula

Looking at the Pacific Ocean.

We stayed in Sequim at the Red Caboose Getaway. The B&B rooms are restored caboose cars. The owner, Olaf, has carefully preserved many of the features of the cars, hid electrical and plumbing lines, and developed a charming operation.

Red Caboose Getaway

The Lavender Express at the Red Caboose Getaway.

As our journey continued we stopped to pick some lavender and see more plants.

Lavender Farm

U-Pick lavender at Purple Haze Lavender Farm.

We caught a ferry to get to Seattle, where we met up with Matt and Lauren.

Seattle 1

Headed toward Seattle on the ferry.

Over the next few days we had great food, saw a baseball game at Safeco Field, visited the Washington Park Arboretum, stopped by the UW Conibear Shellhouse, went to the Pikes Place Market, did the Seattle Underground tour, and had a great time.

Safeco Field 2

The view from our seats in Safeco Field (note the Space Needle left of center).

Our flight from SEA –> SFO was delayed due to high winds and fog at SFO. We got to our car a little after midnight, then did the overnight drive home (and back to work).

It was a great road trip. I’m looking forward to spending more time in the Pacific Northwest.

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Camping and Hiking at Cold Springs

Last weekend Pam and I went camping and hiking at Cold Springs Campground in Sequoia National Park. We were joined by our friends Jason and Lina. The campground is in the Mineral King Valley, a beautiful area that the Walt Disney Co almost turned into a ski resort. The only way into the valley by car is via an old logging road. It’s slow going, with hairpin turns, narrow passages, and no guardrail–though I would not describe it as harrowing or terrifying like I’ve read on some online reviews.

Pam and I arrived on Friday in the early afternoon. We claimed a site and went hiking on the Nature Trail. It winds across the bottom of the valley, somewhat following the East Fork of the Kaweah River. The plants are wonderful: quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides), redstem dogwood (Cornus sericea), false hellebore (Veratrum californicum), and streamside bluebells (Mertensia ciliata) to name a few.

Quaking Aspen

Hiking through the quaking aspens in the Mineral King Valley.

We saw some mule deer along the trail, very close to where we saw mountain quail as well.

Mule Deer

A mule deer with antlers in-progress.

A mountain quail (Oreortyx pictus) picture from a hike last weekend in Mineral King.

A photo posted by Benjamin (@barre7) on

The late spring and early summer are prime marmot season in Mineral King. The furry little rodents emerge from the ground and chew on things. They have been known to destroy cars by targeting brake lines, fan belts, wiring, insulation, and basically anything they can chew. The park service recommends wrapping cars in tarps in the worst marmot spots during this time of year (the trail heads are the worst locations). We hiked by a trail head and saw many wrapped cars.

Marmots

Three out of four cars are practicing marmot protection.

On Saturday we hiked along Mosquito Creek, which took us up toward Miners Ridge. Just below the ridge sits the first Mosquito Lake, which was our destination. By direct line the hike was 1 mile, though in the Sierra Nevada a direct line is rarely possible. We took a route that appears as 1.5 miles on a map, however that route involved many switchbacks that stretched the distance out beyond that. I think it involved ~1,800 ft of elevation gain, with Mosquito Lake sitting at 9,065 ft.

Hiking 6

Hiking near Mosquito Creek.

Hiking 2

Stunning views in Mineral King.

Hiking 7

I was happy to see Dicentra pauciflora in bloom.

Hiking 5

I was fascinated by bush chinquapin (Chrysolepis sempervirens ).

Hiking 3

The high elevation meadows were very cool–notice the snow.

Group Pic 1

The hiking party at Mosquito Lake.

swimming

Three out of four hikers went swimming, the fourth was not swayed by peer pressure.

From what the rest of the group told me, the water in Mosquito Lake was very cold. I was content to sit in a hammock eating bison jerky while they shivered.

Ben and Pam

Posing with my hiking buddy on a ridge in Mineral King.

On our hike back from the lake I was watching for animals. I really wanted to see a bear. And I did. It was watching us intently through the trees.

Bear Watching

The curious bear.

A good day of hiking makes peanut butter and jelly, jerky, and an apple taste like a feast.

On the way home Sunday we stopped in Silver City. We had sandwiches and pumpkin pie at the little store/cafe. The pumpkin pie is usually not on the menu, but they had hosted a wedding that morning and sold out of their famous fruit pies, and the pumpkin pie was leftover from a wedding request–so we got it.

It was a good weekend in the woods.

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The Spring Quarter Draws to a Close

Final Exam week is this coming week at Cal Poly. As the academic year winds down I am planning my summer. I have many things to accomplish and do, yet I also want to recharge.

In the spring quarter I’ve run a few experiments that are repeats from last summer. The char effects appear relatively consistent with the ones I saw last summer, so one of my summer projects is to see if I can develop a manuscript from this data.

Ajuga Photo

Ajuga cutting rooting responses to char treatments (bar = 1 cm).

I’ve been adding to my large collection of plant pictures in preparation for teaching Plant Materials I and II in the 2016-2017 academic year. One of my summer goals is to create the framework for the class and fill in as much as I can. Building the class will make the fall and spring extra busy, but I’m excited about the opportunity to do it. Recently I was walking through the Leaning Pine Arboretum and I saw several monarch butterfly larvae on an Asclepias.

Asclepias

One of the future monarch butterflies munching on Asclepias.

Back in March Pam and I went camping in Big Sur. It was a fun trip. We were nestled in among the coast redwoods, with amazing numbers of wild irises around us.

Camping1

Our campsite in the forest.

Camping2

An exquisite iris in the forest.

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A Spring Update

The spring is a busy season of life. I’ve had many times that I’ve thought I should write a blog post about this but lacked the time. Some of the things that almost got a post: the 2016 NCLC Team trip to Mississippi, the Tomato Mania sale, various plant pictures, political discourse, baseball strategy (particularly bunting), and today the FFA State Finals (and they’ll get a brief mention).

Today the FFA State Finals were held at Cal Poly. I am the faculty advisor for the Nursery and Landscape Competition, so I’ve been working on staging this contest for the past few months. It went relatively well, though there was a glitch with one of the judging contests that I’m not happy about. But now I can close the books on FFA until early 2017, when planning for the next contest will begin. I showed up on campus well before 7am this morning to ensure I was ready for the start of the event. After I parked my car I was gathering things to begin walking and a van pulled into the parking lot. The Eye of the Tiger was blasting over the speakers. At the conclusion of the song the doors slid open and the contestants poured out. It made me laugh.

Now that the bulk of my extra service activities (NCLC, Tomato mania, and FFA) are wrapped up for the year I can focus on other things. I have one manuscript close to submission. My goal is to have it submitted before the end of the academic year. A second manuscript will be written over the summer.

Over the summer I’ll be preparing to take over Plant Materials I and II (taught in two quarters) next academic year. It will be a large undertaking, but I’ll enjoy it. I have  a mountain of hours to put into preparing that class, but I need to generate publications to keep my job . . . so I need to prioritize.

 

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Grandpa Hoover

My Grandpa Hoover (Daniel A. Hoover) has always been a hero to me. At first it was because he created a steel business that had a big warehouse, trucks, and large machinery. From an early age I believed I could do almost anything, in part because Grandpa built Hoover Steel, Inc. With time my Grandpa maintained his hero status with other things. He knew a lot about rocks and gems. He invented stuff. He was generous. He was always curious about the world around him. He loved my Grandma and said so freely. He adored my Grandma. All these things made my Grandpa a hero.

Grandpa did not have an easy life. He overcame adversity and ensured that his family looked different than the one he came from. He did not dwell in the past. In hindsight, I see that he spoke mostly of the present and future. Grandpa saw a bright future for his kids and grandkids.

I remember Grandpa paying me $5.00 to accompany him on trips to the steel mill when I was young. We would leave early in the morning in the tractor trailer. During most of the trip we would ride in silence, but conversations would pop up at various times, often relating to steel or what I was learning in school. We would stop for lunch at a roadside restaurant, and without fail Grandpa would introduce me to everyone who would listen. I always ordered the cheapest thing on the menu (either a grilled cheese sandwich or BLT), and Grandpa seemed to appreciate that fact.

Grandpa liked to hire his grandkids to do little tasks. He was always generous about the payment, but he only paid when the job was fully completed. It was his way of ensuring that we had a good work ethic and associated work with a reward. As a little guy I swept floors, took garbage to the dumpster, weed-whacked brush, mulched gardens, shucked corn, washed trucks, organized rocks, pulled weeds, fed dogs, and did all sorts of odd jobs. My work ethic was shaped by many factors, but Grandpa definitely contributed.

As I got older my conversations with my Grandfather changed. He would talk to me about business opportunities. When I began working at a nursery as a teenager, he thought growing shrubs shaped like letters was a great market to target because plants are not regulated like billboards. By the time I reached graduate school he was mostly focused on whether I was going to find a wife and science. The comments about a wife were lighthearted. He never pushed the topic. The science questions were more persistent. He had questions about tomato growth. He wanted to know why some tomatoes were good and others bad, or what was causing a particular disease. He was intrigued by the parts of a tomato, particularly the placental tissue in the mesocarp, and he wondered if some physical characteristics were associated with taste quality. Grandpa never made it to high school; I think he would have loved the opportunity to study science at a university. I have treasured my high school, undergraduate, and graduate education because I know that it is a privilege not everyone is afforded. I’m grateful for the curiosity and love of learning that my Grandfather passed on to me. And back to the wife question, when I introduced Pam to my Grandpa he told me he approved.

Grandpa ran the race set before him. He loved Jesus, loved his family, and he loved others. I’m proud to call him my Grandfather. I’ll miss you Grandpa—thanks for being you.

I found out my Grandpa passed away as I was walking to teach my Nursery Crop Production class. I had just mentioned him in the previous class, due to his belief that shrubs shaped like letters were an untapped, rich market. The latter part of this week I’ve been a bit distracted as I processed my Grandpa’s passing and tried to decide if I would make a trip back east for the funeral. In the end I decided to stay in California and write this tribute to him. I might be wrong, but I think the fact that one of his grandsons will be teaching a college statistics class during his burial ceremony would have made him happy–he loved learning and education.

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